How to turn your captive audience into buyers

Customer Satisfaction

03/24/2015

"I'm just browsing." It's a phrase every store representative has heard. In reality, salespeople know these passive customers are looking to fulfill a need - they just don't want to be bothered.

"I'm just browsing." It's a phrase every store representative has heard. In reality, salespeople know these passive customers are looking to fulfill a need - they just don't want to be bothered.

Unfortunately, 80 percent of the people who enter your store with that "just browsing" mentality end up leaving your outlet empty-handed, according to Retail TouchPoints contributor Kevin Blackmore. A number of factors could have contributed to that patron's decision to refrain from purchasing an item, but a lack of information delivery is the likely culprit.

Why they're browsing
Generally, there are three reasons why store patrons pull the "I'm just browsing" line, as noted by CustomerThink:

  • They don't have a concrete idea as to what they're looking for.
  • They want to figure out what they want to purchase on their own.
  • They feel as if salespeople will coax them into buying products that management told them to sell.

What options are you left with? From what we can glean, these customers are all about self-service and self-education, because they only trust their own opinions. Therefore, store management must provide them with hubs where they can vet products and services on their own terms.

Image removed.There are times when a customer may find exactly what he or she is looking for.

How can information kiosks provide that need?
Integrating reliable, clear information to browsers through interactive kiosks is imperative. If they wanted to be bombarded with a barrage of illusive, promotional jargon, they would speak to an overzealous salesperson. Videos, customer reviews and other content will appeal to customers who are looking to go beyond an item's packaging.

It's also important for a kiosk to complement the mentality of a browser. Suppose a certain product catches a patron's attention. After watching the first 20 seconds of a video, he or she deduces that it won't fulfill the need he or she wants to satisfy. Providing the shopper with the option to revisit a list of items with one swipe is necessary - it's aligned with the "think on your feet" mindset browsers carry when making split-second decisions about specific products.

"You should be wary of how you deliver sales information through your kiosk."



Freedom of choice
Just as you should avoid leveraging promotional content, you should be wary of how you deliver sales information through your kiosk. Ultimately, this should serve as a library of non-biased data, but when a patron finds that one item that fulfills his or her needs, the customer is going to want to know what it costs. Furthermore, browsers who are willing to purchase specific goods should be made aware of discounts, warrantees and other ideas that apply to those products.

Sales information should be accessible, but not an overwhelming part of the experience. Routing patrons to this data is as simple as integrating a small button at the top left-hand side of the screen showing the words "I'm interested." Have the message be humble, but prompt an action on the consumer's end.

Kiosk design and marketing principles are key ingredients in turning browsers into buyers. Above all, the devices must guide these patrons through the process. Don't push or shove them into purchasing products they don't want - simply offer a lending hand.

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